Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Counting with Formulas.

Counting with Formulas

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 4, 2012)

1

If you are working with a data table that has a limited number of categories by which you want a count, you can use the COUNTIF worksheet function to do your work. For instance, you may have a data table that has two columns. Column A could be names of customers and Column B could be names of sales representatives. There are only half a dozen sales representatives, but scores of customers.

In Column E, list the names of your sales reps, one rep per row. (If you have only a half dozen sales reps, you should have only six rows filled out.) Begin in Row 2, since E1 will probably be used for the column name, such as "Sales Rep." The sales rep names should be spelled exactly as they appear in the data table.

In Column F, beside the first sales rep, enter the following formula:

=COUNTIF($A$2:$B$200,"="&$E2)

Make sure you replace $A$2:$B$200 with the actual range of your original data table. (You could use a named range, if desired.)

Copy this formula (cell F2) into the other five rows of Column F (cells F3:F7), right beside each sales rep's name.

That's it! The information in Column F represents the number of customers for each sales rep.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2159) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Counting with Formulas.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is one more than 2?

2012-08-09 16:19:47

Karl

This is great but how do I count the cells based on the month only? Example: I have a column of dates that span 2 years (from 1/1/2011 to 12/31/2012). I want to count all of the cells than have any date in "May" ignoring the year?


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