Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Quickly Filling a Column.

Quickly Filling a Column

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated September 16, 2014)

When creating a many-row worksheet, it is often necessary to type a formula in one of the top rows and fill the column with that same formula. A convenient way to find the bottom of the column is to go there once (when you are first working with the worksheet) and place a character in each cell of the last row.

Now, when you place your formula at the top of the column, you can simply do this:

  1. Select the cell that has your formula in it. (The one you just entered.)
  2. Press Ctrl+Shift+Down Arrow. This selects all the cells from the formula through the "bottom marker" in the column.
  3. Press Ctrl+D. The selected cells are filled with the formula.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2093) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Quickly Filling a Column.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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