Formatting Raw Data

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 22, 2014)

It is not unusual for Excel to be used for common data in a business environment. For instance, it may be used for weekly reports or something similar, where similar data is presented in the same format time after time.

A problem may arise, however, when the data is generated by someone else, but you are charged with formatting it for final presentation. If you find yourself in this situation, you may be doing the same formatting chores over and over again each week.

To solve this situation and apply formatting very quickly to your new (but unformatted) data, follow these steps:

  1. Open up a worksheet that contains your unformatted data.
  2. Open up a worksheet that contains the formatted data from a previous week.
  3. Select all the cells in the formatted worksheet by clicking on the block where the header row and column meet. (Just to the left of the A and just above the 1.)
  4. Click on the Format Painter tool.
  5. Switch to the unformatted worksheet.
  6. Click in cell A1.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (1971) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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