Splitting Your Spreadsheet Window Into Panes

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 3, 2016)

2

You already know that Excel allows you to open multiple spreadsheets at the same time. You can also, however, divide a spreadsheet window into panes (as Microsoft calls them). These panes can be used to view two or four different parts of the same spreadsheet. You can split the worksheet both horizontally and vertically.

To divide a spreadsheet window into panes, you use the divider bar. There are two divider bars. The first is located in the upper-right corner of the spreadsheet window, just above the vertical scroll bar. The second is located in the bottom-right corner of the spreadsheet window, just to the right of the horizontal scroll bar.

When you position the mouse pointer over a divider bar, it changes to a different type of pointer. Click on the divider bar and drag it to where you want the spreadsheet window divided. If you want to divide the spreadsheet window in half (either vertically or horizontally), you can simply double-click on the divider bar.

Another way to divide the worksheet into panes is to choose the Split option from the Window menu. This divides the worksheet into four panes.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (1960) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments for this tip:

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 7 + 8?

2016-09-13 15:48:51

Paladin

Nice! I had never noticed the bottom right divider bar. Thank you!


2015-03-23 18:11:06

Mike Russell

I have seen people deny that this can be done - one even dismissed such a notion by saying; "It really doesn't make any sense for the spreadsheet metaphor."[sic]

But you sire, have surely qualified and positioned yourself as "a good bloke - smart too."


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