Removing Conditional Formats, but Not the Effects

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 25, 2018)

Charlie wondered if there is a way to "make permanent" the effects of conditional formatting at any given time. For instance, if a conditional format specifies that a particular cell be bold red type, then Charlie wanted a way to remove the conditional format and make the cell bold and red.

There is no intrinsic way to do this in Excel; none of the Paste Special options will do the task, as desired. You can, however, use a macro to accomplish the task:

Option Explicit
Sub PasteFC()
    Application.ScreenUpdating = False
    Dim rWhole As Range
    Dim rCell As Range
    Dim ndx As Integer
    Dim FCFont As Font
    Dim FCBorder As Border
    Dim FCInt As Interior
    Dim x As Integer
    Dim iBorders(3) As Integer

    iBorders(0) = xlLeft
    iBorders(1) = xlRight
    iBorders(2) = xlTop
    iBorders(3) = xlBottom

    Set rWhole = Selection

    For Each rCell In rWhole
        rCell.Select
        ndx = ActiveCondition(rCell)
        If ndx <> 0 Then
            'Change the Font info
            Set FCFont = rCell.FormatConditions(ndx).Font
            With rCell.Font
                .Bold = NewFC(.Bold, FCFont.Bold)
                .Italic = NewFC(.Italic, FCFont.Italic)
                .Underline = NewFC(.Underline, FCFont.Underline)
                .Strikethrough = NewFC(.Strikethrough, _
                  FCFont.Strikethrough)
                .ColorIndex = NewFC(.ColorIndex, FCFont.ColorIndex)
            End With
            'Change the Border Info for each of the 4 types
            For x = 0 To 3
                Set FCBorder = rCell.FormatConditions(ndx).Borders(iBorders(x))
                With rCell.Borders(iBorders(x))
                    .LineStyle = NewFC(.LineStyle, FCBorder.LineStyle)
                    .Weight = NewFC(.Weight, FCBorder.Weight)
                    .ColorIndex = NewFC(.ColorIndex, FCBorder.ColorIndex)
                End With
            Next x
            'Change the interior info
            Set FCInt = rCell.FormatConditions(ndx).Interior
            With rCell.Interior
                .ColorIndex = NewFC(.ColorIndex, FCInt.ColorIndex)
                .Pattern = NewFC(.Pattern, FCInt.Pattern)
            End With
            'Delete FC
            rCell.FormatConditions.Delete
        End If
    Next
    rWhole.Select
    Application.ScreenUpdating = True
    MsgBox ("The Formatting based on the Conditions" & vbCrLf & _
      "in the range " & rWhole.Address & vbCrLf & _
      "has been made standard for those cells" & vbCrLf & _
      "and the Conditional Formatting has been removed")
End Sub
Function NewFC(vCurrent As Variant, vNew As Variant)
    If IsNull(vNew) Then
        NewFC = vCurrent
    Else
        NewFC = vNew
    End If
End Function
Function ActiveCondition(rng As Range) As Integer
    'Chip Pearson http://www.cpearson.com/excel/CFColors.htm
    Dim ndx As Long
    Dim FC As FormatCondition

    If rng.FormatConditions.Count = 0 Then
        ActiveCondition = 0
    Else
    For ndx = 1 To rng.FormatConditions.Count
        Set FC = rng.FormatConditions(ndx)
        Select Case FC.Type
            Case xlCellValue
                Select Case FC.Operator
                    Case xlBetween
                        If CDbl(rng.Value) >= CDbl(FC.Formula1) And _
                          CDbl(rng.Value) <= CDbl(FC.Formula2) Then
                            ActiveCondition = ndx
                            Exit Function
                        End If
                    Case xlGreater
                        If CDbl(rng.Value) > CDbl(FC.Formula1) Then
                            ActiveCondition = ndx
                            Exit Function
                        End If
                    Case xlEqual
                        If CDbl(rng.Value) = CDbl(FC.Formula1) Then
                            ActiveCondition = ndx
                            Exit Function
                        End If
                    Case xlGreaterEqual
                        If CDbl(rng.Value) >= CDbl(FC.Formula1) Then
                            ActiveCondition = ndx
                            Exit Function
                        End If
                    Case xlLess
                        If CDbl(rng.Value) < CDbl(FC.Formula1) Then
                            ActiveCondition = ndx
                            Exit Function
                        End If
                    Case xlLessEqual
                        If CDbl(rng.Value) <= CDbl(FC.Formula1) Then
                            ActiveCondition = ndx
                            Exit Function
                        End If
                    Case xlNotEqual
                        If CDbl(rng.Value) <> CDbl(FC.Formula1) Then
                            ActiveCondition = ndx
                            Exit Function
                        End If
                    Case xlNotBetween
                        If CDbl(rng.Value) <= CDbl(FC.Formula1) Or _
                            CDbl(rng.Value) >= CDbl(FC.Formula2) Then
                            ActiveCondition = ndx
                            Exit Function
                        End If
                    Case Else
                        Debug.Print "UNKNOWN OPERATOR"
                End Select
            Case xlExpression
                If Application.Evaluate(FC.Formula1) Then
                    ActiveCondition = ndx
                    Exit Function
                End If
            Case Else
                Debug.Print "UNKNOWN TYPE"
        End Select
    Next ndx
    End If
    ActiveCondition = 0
End Function

There are three procedures in this solution. The last procedure, ActiveCondition, is designed to return a number indicating which of the conditions in a conditional format is currently in effect. This routine was found at Chip Pearson's site, as indicated in the first comment of the function. (No sense in re-inventing the wheel. :>))

The center function, NewFC, is simply used to determine which of two values is valid. The procedure you actually run, however, is PasteFC. Simply select the cells you want to convert to explicit formatting, then run the procedure. It checks each cell you selected for which formatting condition is active, determines the formatting of that condition, and then applies it to the cell. Finally, the conditional formatting for the cell is removed.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (1947) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Understanding the At and Ln Indicators

Part of the helpful information that Word provides on the status bar is designated by the labels "At" and "Ln." Here's ...

Discover More

Spacing After Sentences

Word can check to see if you have a consistent number of spaces at the end of your sentences.

Discover More

Cell Movement After Enter

What happens when you press Enter in a cell depends on how you have Excel configured. Here's the way you can control the ...

Discover More

Save Time and Supercharge Excel! Automate virtually any routine task and save yourself hours, days, maybe even weeks. Then, learn how to make Excel do things you thought were simply impossible! Mastering advanced Excel macros has never been easier. Check out Excel 2010 VBA and Macros today!

More ExcelTips (menu)

Conditionally Formatting Non-Integers

The conditional formatting capabilities of Excel are very helpful when you want to call attention to different values ...

Discover More

Conditionally Making a Sound

Need to have a sound played if a certain condition is met? It is rather easy to do if you use a user-defined function to ...

Discover More

Changing Shading when a Column Value Changes

If you have a data table in a worksheet, and you want to shade various rows based on whatever is in the first column, ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is one less than 3?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.