Loading
Excel.Tips.Net ExcelTips (Menu Interface)

Adjusting Row Height for a Number of Worksheets

Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Adjusting Row Height for a Number of Worksheets.

Ron knows how to adjust the height of a group of adjacent rows. What he doesn't know (and needs to) is how to make row heights the same across several worksheets in the same workbook.

The trick to this operation is to simply make sure that you select all the worksheets you want to affect. Take a look at the worksheet tabs at the bottom of the program window. You should see one for each worksheet in your workbook. If you want to affect the rows in a series of consecutive worksheets, click the tab for the first worksheet in the series and hold down the Shift key as you click the tab for the last. If the worksheets you want to affect are not consecutive, click the tab for one of the worksheets and then hold down the Ctrl key as you click on the tabs for each of the others.

With all the worksheets you want to affect selected, select the rows within the worksheet you can see. As you adjust the row height for those rows, Excel automatically adjusts the row height for the same rows in each of the other selected worksheets.

When you are done, click on a single worksheet tab. This cancels the selected set of worksheets, and you can continue to work as you desire. (If you don't cancel the selection set, then any changes you make on the screen continue to be made in all the selected worksheets.)

If you need to adjust row heights quite a bit, and your formatting is always the same, then you might benefit from having a macro to affect the sheets. The following macro steps through each selected worksheet and adjusts the height of rows 1 through 5. (You should obviously change the row height in the macro and the row numbers to reflect what you really need.)

Sub row_hts()
    For Each wksht In Worksheets
        Set sht = wksht
        sht.Rows("1:5").RowHeight = 25
    Next
End Sub

You can easily assign the macro to a shortcut key or a menu option so it can quickly be executed.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (12510) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Adjusting Row Height for a Number of Worksheets.

Related Tips:

Professional Development Guidance! Four world-class developers offer start-to-finish guidance for building powerful, robust, and secure applications with Excel. The authors show how to consistently make the right design decisions and make the most of Excel's powerful features. Check out Professional Excel Development today!

 

Leave your own comment:

*Name:
Email:
  Notify me about new comments ONLY FOR THIS TIP
Notify me about new comments ANYWHERE ON THIS SITE
Hide my email address
*Text:
*What is 5+3 (To prevent automated submissions and spam.)
 
 
           Commenting Terms

Comments for this tip:

Peter Quarrell    09 Mar 2013, 06:05
In the macro offered as a solution, I notice the line:
"Set sht = wksht"
which surprises me. My own solution (whicxh works) would omit it, and simply say on the previous line:
"For Each sht in Worksheets"
The For statement's reference to the object "sht" includes Setting it, and there is no need to do it explicitly.
 
 

Our Company

Sharon Parq Associates, Inc.

About Tips.Net

Contact Us

 

Advertise with Us

Our Privacy Policy

Our Sites

Tips.Net

Beauty and Style

Cars

Cleaning

Cooking

DriveTips (Google Drive)

ExcelTips (Excel 97–2003)

ExcelTips (Excel 2007–2016)

Gardening

Health

Home Improvement

Money and Finances

Organizing

Pests and Bugs

Pets and Animals

WindowsTips (Microsoft Windows)

WordTips (Word 97–2003)

WordTips (Word 2007–2016)

Our Products

Helpful E-books

Newsletter Archives

 

Excel Products

Word Products

Our Authors

Author Index

Write for Tips.Net

Copyright © 2016 Sharon Parq Associates, Inc.