Excel.Tips.Net ExcelTips (Menu Interface)

Superscripts in Find and Replace

Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Superscripts in Find and Replace.

Kirk needs to search for things like "yd2" and replace it with "yd2" where the "2" is superscripted. He wonders if there is a way to do that in Excel.

The find and replace capabilities of Excel are more limited than those of Word, where such replacements are relatively easy. While you could export your information to Word, do the replacements, and then import it back into Excel, there are some things you can do without ever leaving Excel.

First, however, let's examine something that you might reasonably think would work, but doesn't really. Note that the Replace tab of the Find and Replace dialog box seems to provide a way to specify attributes for the text you want to use as the replacement. This might lead you to think that you could do the following:

  1. Replace all instances of yd2 with yd$*$
  2. Replace all instances of $*$ with a superscripted 2.

While this sounds good in theory, it won't work. You can follow the steps, including making sure that the replacement 2 is set to be superscript. The problem, however, is that Excel applies the superscript format to the entire cell, not just to the 2. Thus, you end up with yd2 completely as superscript.

You could, if you wanted, skip superscripting all together and just use a typeface character that appears superscripted. If you use the Symbol dialog box, you can find the digits 0 through 3 that appear superscripted. If you use the superscripted digit 2 (ASCII 178) in your replacement text, then you can get the desired appearance. Follow these steps:

  1. Press Ctrl+H to display the Replace tab of the Find and Replace dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  2. Figure 1. The Replace tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.

  3. In the Find What box enter yd2.
  4. In the Replace With box enter yd and then hold down the Alt key as you type 0178 on the numeric keypad.
  5. Click Replace All.

Finally, if you really want to use superscripts, your best bet is going to be using a macro to do the formatting. The simplest method is tied to the specific example provided—making the 2 in yd2 superscript.

Sub DoConvert()
    Dim c As Range

    For Each c In Selection.Cells
        If c.Value = "yd2" Then
            c.Characters(3, 1).Font.Superscript = True
        End If
End Sub

To use the macro, select the cells you want to modify, then run the macro. Each cell in the selection is stepped through and checked to see if it contains the text yd2. If it does, then the third character (the 2) is made superscript; the rest of the cell is undisturbed.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (5490) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Superscripts in Find and Replace.

Related Tips:

Program Successfully in Excel! John Walkenbach's name is synonymous with excellence in deciphering complex technical topics. With this comprehensive guide, "Mr. Spreadsheet" shows how to maximize your Excel experience using professional spreadsheet application development tips from his own personal bookshelf. Check out Excel 2013 Power Programming with VBA today!


Leave your own comment:

  Notify me about new comments ONLY FOR THIS TIP
Notify me about new comments ANYWHERE ON THIS SITE
Hide my email address
*What is 5+3 (To prevent automated submissions and spam.)
           Commenting Terms

Comments for this tip:

Louis    16 Apr 2015, 09:38

I just noticed someone provides a machine translation of your article, unreferenced (at http://www.stansstuff.com/exposants-dans-rechercher-et-remplacer/), without even mentioning it is an automatic translation, which is both unfair to you and almost impossible to understand in French.

I thought you should know, since it is clearly a copyright infringement... while also bringing language pollution to people looking for a legible solution in French.

Our Company

Sharon Parq Associates, Inc.

About Tips.Net

Contact Us


Advertise with Us

Our Privacy Policy

Our Sites


Beauty and Style




DriveTips (Google Drive)

ExcelTips (Excel 97–2003)

ExcelTips (Excel 2007–2016)



Home Improvement

Money and Finances


Pests and Bugs

Pets and Animals

WindowsTips (Microsoft Windows)

WordTips (Word 97–2003)

WordTips (Word 2007–2016)

Our Products

Helpful E-books

Newsletter Archives


Excel Products

Word Products

Our Authors

Author Index

Write for Tips.Net

Copyright © 2016 Sharon Parq Associates, Inc.