Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Counting Odds and Evens.

Counting Odds and Evens

Written by Allen Wyatt (last updated June 6, 2020)
This tip applies to Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003


1

Pini has a range of whole numbers (let's say C2:J2) and some of the numbers can be odd and some even. He would like a formula to count the number of odd values in the range and another to count the number of even values in the range.

There are a couple of ways to derive the desired counts, without resorting to intermediate values or macros. One way is to use an array formula, such as the following, to determine a count of odd values:

=SUM((MOD(C2:J2,2)<>0)*1)

Enter the formula using Ctrl+Shift+Enter and you get the desired count. Only a small change is required for the array formula to return the count of even numbers:

=SUM((MOD(C2:J2,2)=0)*1)

If you prefer to not use an array formula, you could use SUMPRODUCT to return the same count, as a regular formula. For example, here is the formula to return a count of odd values:

=SUMPRODUCT(--(MOD(C2:J2,2)=1),--(C2:J2<>""))

This is the formula for even values:

=SUMPRODUCT(--(MOD(C2:J2,2)=0),--(C2:J2<>""))

Another advantage of using the SUMPRODUCT approach is that it compensates for possible blank cells in your range. The earlier array formulas will always count blank cells as if they contain an even value.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (7985) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Counting Odds and Evens.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is two less than 3?

2021-06-03 14:11:57

Jon

Hello, I have been trying to find a version of counting the Odd or Even numbers that figures out how many there are between just two numbers.

For example, in my sheet, I have 2 cells right next to each other. The first cell, E6, has the starting number, the second cell, E7, will have the ending number

E6 - 115
E7 - 120

What I am trying to do is find out how many between those numbers are Even when a box is checked, and when another box is checked instead, how many are odd.

Every example and explanation that I have seen always count a full range, like in your example, C2:J2.

Do you know if this formula will be able to calculate that or is there another avenue I should explore?

Thanks
Jon


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