Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Notation for Thousands and Millions.

Notation for Thousands and Millions

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated September 23, 2013)

7

Jim wonders how he can get Excel to automatically display numbers using "k" for thousands and "m" for millions. As an example, if a cell contains the value $470,000 he would like it displayed as $470k; if it contains the value $1,107,432 he would like it displayed as $1.1m.

One obvious method is to create a formula that will display the information as desired. The following formula will take into account the magnitude of the number in cell B2 and then provide a formatted text string appropriate to that magnitude:

=IF(B2 < 1000,B2,IF(B2 < 1000000,
"$" & ROUND(B2/1000,1) & "k",
"$" & ROUND(B2/1000000,1) & "m"))

Remember that this is a single formula and should be entered entirely on one line. The drawback with such an approach, of course, is that the formula takes up space within your worksheet. To get around this you could, instead, create a custom format that will simply affect the display of the number in the cell.

To create a custom format if you are using a version of Excel prior to Excel 2007, choose Cells from the Format menu, display the Number tab, and click Custom at the left side of the dialog box. Here's the custom format you should create in the dialog box:

[>1000000]$#.0,,"m";[>1000]$#,"k";$#,##0

This format will display both millions and thousands using the desired notation. If the number is below a thousand then it will be displayed without any special notation. As appropriate, values are rounded to one decimal place.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3528) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Notation for Thousands and Millions.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Can't Select Style Instances

Using the Styles and Formatting task pane, Word allows you to select all instances of a given style in your document. This ...

Discover More

Changing Dialog Box Pull-Down List Item Order

When selecting options within menus, Word frequently displays additional options in dialog boxes. While customizing the order ...

Discover More

No-border Text Boxes by Default

Text boxes can be a great design element when laying out your documents. If you want those text boxes to have no borders (or ...

Discover More

Professional Development Guidance! Four world-class developers offer start-to-finish guidance for building powerful, robust, and secure applications with Excel. The authors show how to consistently make the right design decisions and make the most of Excel's powerful features. Check out Professional Excel Development today!

More ExcelTips (menu)

Displaying Zeros

There are times when displaying zero values in a worksheet (especially if there are lots of them) can be distracting from the ...

Discover More

Preventing Changes to Formatting and Page Size

When you create workbooks for others to use, you might want to make sure that they can't change the formatting and paper size ...

Discover More

Adding Drop Shadows to Cells

Want to draw attention to what is in a cell? What better way than to add a drop shadow to that cell! Here's how you can do ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is six less than 6?

2016-08-18 19:39:48

Stevo

What is the number is negative? How do you show it in red with a "-"?


2016-06-06 20:45:14

Samir

I would use this format to make it so less than $1000 numbers show up as "$0.XK"

[>1000000]$#.0,,"M";[>1000]$#,"K";"$"0,.0"K"


2015-09-18 18:07:52

Karen

Worked perfectly. I took out the $ for my presentation and changed "m" to "M"... got exactly what I needed. THANKS!


2015-09-09 12:09:53

Ramiro

THANK YOU!


2015-06-18 13:36:20

Kim

Love it! Thanks - just what I needed to add variable dollar amounts to a concatenated heading above a table.
I made a slight modification to add 2 decimal places to my millions figure because it wasn't displaying a decimal place when it was, e.g., $2,027,230, resulting in a display of $2.03M, perfect:
=IF(AL6 <= 1000,"$"&AL6,IF(AL6 <= 1000000,"$" & ROUND(AL6/1000,1) & "K","$" & ROUND(AL6/1000000,2) & "M"))
Thank you!


2014-05-29 12:17:46

Bill

To fix the 1,000k or 1,000m issue add a "=" infront of both ">" symbols.


2012-01-20 07:11:14

Teman

Thanks Allen, however I have tried this custom format and it does not contract thousands (e.g. 1,100) to 1.1k. Instead I get 1,100 k which is 1.1 M. Any suggestion?

Thanks,
Teman


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.