Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Recording a Macro.

Recording a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 29, 2013)

If you have a repetitive task that is a good candidate for a macro, you can use the macro recording capabilities of Excel to turn your actions into a macro. To record a macro, follow these steps:

  1. Choose the Macro option from the Tools menu. Excel displays a submenu.
  2. Choose the Record New Macro option from the submenu. Excel displays the Record Macro dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Record Macro dialog box.

  4. In the Macro Name field, provide a name you want used for your macro. You can accept the default name, if you desire, but if you plan on using the macro more than once or twice, you will want to use a more descriptive name. The name you provide must not include any spaces.
  5. In the Description box you can provide an optional comment about your macro.
  6. Use the Store Macro In drop-down list to specify where you want the macro stored.
  7. Click OK.

Excel displays the Stop Recording toolbar and starts recording everything you do. The actions you take become steps in the macro, and will be repeated when you later execute the macro. The Stop Recording toolbar is very small and consists of only two tools.

When you have finished the steps you want recorded in your macro, click on the stop button on the Stop Recording toolbar. The macro is then saved and available for use at any time.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2923) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Recording a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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