Quickly Identifying Applied AutoFilters

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated October 11, 2018)

2

Jim wants a way to quickly tell what filtering criteria have been applied in an AutoFilter. He has a hard time telling even which columns have filtering applied (the slight change in drop-down arrow color from black to blue is hardly noticeable), so some other method of telling where a filter is applied would be nice.

The lack of contrast between the black and blue drop-down arrows in a filtered column is not an uncommon complaint. In fact, this very issue was addressed in a different issue of ExcelTips. (You can search at the ExcelTips Web site for the phrase "drop-down arrow colors" for a handy tip in this regard.)

If you actually want to know what criteria are being applied to a column, then you'll be interested in a small macro that will place the criteria into another cell:

Function DispCriteria(Rng As Range) As String
    Dim Filter As String

    Filter = ""
    On Error GoTo Done
    With Rng.Parent.AutoFilter
        If Intersect(Rng, .Range) Is Nothing Then GoTo Done
        With .Filters(Rng.Column - .Range.Column + 1)
            If Not .On Then GoTo Done
            Filter = .Criteria1
            Select Case .Operator
                Case xlAnd
                    Filter = Filter & " AND " & .Criteria2
                Case xlOr
                    Filter = Filter & " OR " & .Criteria2
            End Select
        End With
    End With
Done:
    DispCriteria = Filter
End Function

This is actually a user-defined function that you can use in your worksheet. For instance, if you wanted to know the filtering criteria that was applied to column C, you could use the following in a cell:

=DispCriteria(C:C)

If you prefer, you could simply reference the header cell for the column being filtered. For example, if the header (the one to which AutoFilter adds the drop-down arrow) is cell C3, you could use the following:

=DispCriteria(C3)

The criteria displayed by the function are those actually used by AutoFilter. For instance, if you use a filtering criteria that says "Top 10," then Excel translates that at the time it is applied into something like ">=214.3281932" (the value will vary, depending on your data). It is the formulatic filter that is returned by the DispCriteria function, not the "Top 10" wording.

The function is based on one created by Microsoft MVP Stephen Bullen. The macro has been published in various places, and you can find it on John Walkenbach's Web site, here:

http://www.j-walk.com/ss/excel/usertips/tip044.htm

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the ExcelTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2891) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is one less than 7?

2019-09-09 09:41:29

Joanna Weir

using the above code, when I filter using "Text filter Contains" and type a partial search (e.g. 'Whole' instead of 'Wholesale'.... the filter works, but the formula to display the filter criteria is blank. Please advise how to resolve this.


2019-09-03 16:38:28

Mark

Hi Allen,

This works great when using the formula bar where there is only 2 criteria active. However is the auto filter has more than 2 criteria this only displays a blank cell. How can this be upgraded to list all possible criteria? I have tried to adjust this so I can call this function from inside another function but it doesn't work. Do you know how to adjust this so it can be exclusive to the vba environment?

Thank you


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