Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Understanding Views.

Understanding Views

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 19, 2015)

1

A view is a pattern for what information within a worksheet should look like. This pattern can be given a name and saved within Excel. The named view can later be recalled quickly. In some ways a view is similar to a scenario. (Scenarios are discussed in other issues of ExcelTips.) They differ, however, in that a scenario deals with the content (the values) stored in a worksheet, while a view is concerned with how the worksheet appears.

A view can contain information such as which rows and columns are visible, row height, column width, formatting characteristics, and window size and position. You can define and store several views of data in a worksheet. For instance, one view could show the entire worksheet, while another could show a condensed (or summary) view of the information. Still another could be used to show the full worksheet on the screen at one time.

To create a view, follow these steps:

  1. Format and situate your worksheet as you want it to appear.
  2. Choose Custom Views from the View menu. Excel displays the Custom Views dialog box.
  3. Click on the Add button. Excel displays the Add View dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Add View dialog box.

  5. In the Name field, supply the name you want associated with this view. This name can be up to 255 characters long, including spaces.
  6. In the View Includes section, select the options that reflect what you want saved with this view. You can choose to include both print settings and hidden rows and columns.
  7. When you are satisfied with your settings, click the OK button. The current view is saved by Excel.

You can now proceed to adjust the formatting and display of your worksheet so it reflects what you want saved as the next view. Repeat this process to store the new view.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2865) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Understanding Views.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Conditionally Formatting for Multiple Date Comparisons

When you compare dates in a conditional formatting rule, you need to be careful how you put your comparisons together. Do ...

Discover More

Selecting Sentences

Need to select an entire sentence at once? You can do so by creating a short macro that does the task for you, or you can ...

Discover More

Printing Images Based on Hidden Text Setting

When you print your document, the images in the document are normally printed. What if you want only some of your images ...

Discover More

Save Time and Supercharge Excel! Automate virtually any routine task and save yourself hours, days, maybe even weeks. Then, learn how to make Excel do things you thought were simply impossible! Mastering advanced Excel macros has never been easier. Check out Excel 2010 VBA and Macros today!

More ExcelTips (menu)

Adding Buttons to Your Worksheet

You can easily add a button to your worksheet that will allow you to run various macros. This tip shows how easy it is.

Discover More

Making Revisions

You've turned on Highlight Changes, but how do you know what has been changed? This tip explains how Excel displays those ...

Discover More

AutoFilling from a Custom List

AutoFill can be a real timesaver if you often work with set lists of data. You can define your own custom lists and then ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is three more than 8?

2012-09-29 23:54:55

KS Nair

I use this feature a lot. What I also discovered is that is useful to create a "Standard" or "Normal" View of the sheet as it is without any formatting / hidden / filtered etc. rows.

This way, one can revert to the "Standard/Normal" view when creating a new view, without 'undoing' all the changes in the custom view.


This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.