Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Refreshing PivotTable Data.

Refreshing PivotTable Data

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 27, 2016)

Excel PivotTables provide a powerful tool you can use to analyze your data, as you have learned in other ExcelTips. Whenever you change the information in your source data list, you will need to update the PivotTable. There is no need to recreate the table, instead you simply select a cell in the PivotTable and then select Refresh Data from the Data menu, or click on the Refresh Data tool on the PivotTable toolbar.

Updating changes is simple enough, but there is probably an additional step you will want to take if you have added records to your data table. If you have added information at the end of the list, either manually or using a data form, you will want to redefine the data range used to create the PivotTable. To do this, select a cell in the PivotTable and invoke the PivotTable and PivotChart Wizard. When it is displayed, navigate through the steps back to Step 2. (This is the step that allows you to specify the cell range to use for the PivotTable.) Make sure the cell range reflects accurately the range you want included in the PivotTable.

You should note that if you are adding rows in the middle of the PivotTable's data range, or if you delete rows, you do not need to be concerned about the cell range reflected in the PivotTable Wizard. Excel will make sure it is adjusted correctly. (You only need to be concerned when you add rows or columns to the end of the cell range.)

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2471) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Refreshing PivotTable Data.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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