Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Every Second Tuesday.

Every Second Tuesday

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 4, 2014)

Roland is looking for a way to create a list of every second Tuesday through an entire year. Fortunately, there are many ways you can come up with every other Tuesday. The first is to simply use a formula to do the dates for you, as is done in these steps:

  1. In cell A2, enter the date of the starting Tuesday.
  2. In cell A3, enter the formula =A2+14.
  3. Copy cell A3 down to as many cells as desired.

That's it; the dates are all Tuesdays—every second Tuesday—because you've added 14 (the number of days in two weeks) to the previous Tuesday's date. This approach has a benefit, as well: If you change the date in cell A2, then all the other dates change, as well. This allows you to have a dynamic set of dates, each date two weeks later than the previous date.

If you don't need the list to be dynamic, then you can create a list of second-Tuesday dates in this manner:

  1. In cell A2, enter the date of the starting Tuesday.
  2. Select the range A2:A30. (You can actually pick any range you want; just make sure you pick the range you want filled with dates, and cell A2 must be the first cell in the range.)
  3. Choose Edit | Fill | Series. Excel displays the Series dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Series dialog box.

  5. Change the step value to 14.
  6. Click OK.

The result is that Excel fills all the selected cells with dates that are 14 days apart from each other. Another way to display the same Series dialog box is to perform step 1 and then right-click on the Fill handle and drag it downward. When you release the mouse button, a Context menu appears. Choose Series, and the Series dialog box appears. You can then continue with steps 4 and 5.

If you'd rather not mess with the Series dialog box, there is a shortcut way of accomplishing the same task using the Fill handle:

  1. In cell A2, enter the date of the starting Tuesday.
  2. In cell A3, enter the date of the second Tuesday following (14 days later).
  3. Select cells A2:A3.
  4. Drag the Fill handle downward for as many cells as desired.

When you release the Fill handle, Excel fills those cells with dates that are patterned after the two dates in cells A2:A3. Since those dates are two weeks apart, the filled dates will also be two weeks apart.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2428) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Every Second Tuesday.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Exporting a Graphics Group

Need to export a graphics group from a chart so that you can use the group in a different program? It's not as easy as you ...

Discover More

How Word Applies Styles

Styles are a great boon for applying styles in a powerfully consistent manner. How Word applies styles, however, depends on ...

Discover More

Underlining Tabs In Numbered Lists

When Word creates an automatically numbered list, it removes some of your formatting flexibility. One thing you can't seem to ...

Discover More

Program Successfully in Excel! John Walkenbach's name is synonymous with excellence in deciphering complex technical topics. With this comprehensive guide, "Mr. Spreadsheet" shows how to maximize your Excel experience using professional spreadsheet application development tips from his own personal bookshelf. Check out Excel 2013 Power Programming with VBA today!

MORE EXCELTIPS (MENU)

The Last Business Day

Many businesses need to know when the last business day of the month occurs. This tip discusses several ways you can ...

Discover More

Calculating the Last Day in a Week Number

Given a particular week number for a year, you may want to figure out the date of the last day in that week. There is no ...

Discover More

Days Left in the Year

Sometimes it is handy to know how many days are left in the current year. This tip provides a quick formula that indicates ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Excel that uses the menu interface (Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, or Excel 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Excel, visit our ExcelTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share