Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Inserting Worksheet Values with a Macro.

Inserting Worksheet Values with a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 28, 2016)

Inserting values into a cell is done quite often in macros. In order to insert information into a cell, you use the Value property. For instance, you could use the following to insert a number (23) into cell A1:

Cells(1, 1).Value = 23

For entering information in a cell, the Value property is applicable to any object that resolves to a range. Thus, you could use the following to place a text value ("Address") into the cell at C4:

Range("C4").Value = "Address"

The above examples insert values directly into the currently active worksheet. You can enter values into a different worksheet by prefixing the examples with a worksheet object, in this manner:

Worksheets.("Sheet3").Range("C4").Value = "Address"

If the worksheet you specify does not exist (it is not currently open in Excel), then the code generates an error. In addition, if the worksheet you are trying to modify is a chart or the cell is protected and the worksheet locked, then you also get an error.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2313) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Inserting Worksheet Values with a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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