Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Using Custom Add-Ins.

Using Custom Add-Ins

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 21, 2014)

After you have created your own add-in, you can use it in your system. Once the add-in has been loaded, the functions or features in the add-in become available to any other workbook you may have open, or any time you are using Excel. All you need to do to use your add-in is follow these steps:

  1. Choose Add-Ins from the Tools menu. This displays the Add-Ins dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  2. Figure 1. The Add-Ins dialog box.

  3. If your custom add-in is visible in the dialog box, click the check box beside it and skip to step 6.
  4. Click on the Browse button. Excel displays a standard file dialog box.
  5. Use the controls in the dialog box to locate and select your custom add-in.
  6. Click on OK. The add-in is loaded and made a part of Excel. (You can tell that the add-in is available because it is now listed in the Add-Ins dialog box.)
  7. Click on OK to close the Add-Ins dialog box.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2277) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Using Custom Add-Ins.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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