Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Specifying Different Weekends with NETWORKDAYS.

Specifying Different Weekends with NETWORKDAYS

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated March 3, 2018)

Sunil can use the NETWORKDAYS function to return the number of regular business days between two dates. The function assumes that Saturday and Sunday are not work days, but in Sunil's organization only Sunday counts as a non-work day. He wonders if there is a way to use NETWORKDAYS and specify that only Sunday should be excluded from the count returned.

You can determine this by using a formula based on the NETWORKDAYS function. Assuming that the starting date is in A1 and the ending date is in B1, the following formula examines the days between the two dates and essentially return a count of non-Sunday days in that range:

=NETWORKDAYS(A1,B1)+SUMPRODUCT(--(WEEKDAY
(ROW(INDIRECT(A1&":"&B1)))=7))

Of course, since Sundays are the only day of the week being excluded, you could simply skip the use of NETWORKDAYS and use SUMPRODUCT to figure out if the day should be counted or not:

=SUMPRODUCT(--(WEEKDAY(ROW(INDIRECT(A1&":"&B1)))>1))

If you expect that there may be holidays in the range, and that those holidays are in the named range "holidays," then you'll need to go back to using NETWORKDAYS in the formula:

=NETWORKDAYS(A1,B1,holidays)+SUMPRODUCT(--
(WEEKDAY(ROW(INDIRECT(A1&":"&B1)))=7),--
(NOT(ISNUMBER(MATCH(ROW(INDIRECT(A1&":"&B1))
,holidays,0)))))

Other variations of what constitutes the work days in a week have been covered by Chip Pearson at his site:

http://www.cpearson.com/excel/betternetworkdays.aspx

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (7093) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Specifying Different Weekends with NETWORKDAYS.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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