Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Protecting Worksheets from Deletion.

Protecting Worksheets from Deletion

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated April 28, 2012)

Chris has a workbook composed of two control worksheets that contain setup data. The workbook's user runs macros that create many new worksheets in the workbook. The user then deletes any unwanted worksheets. Chris wants to make sure that the two control worksheets aren't deleted by mistake.

This can be accomplished, to some extent, by protecting the structure of the workbook, as described in other ExcelTips. This protects the workbook structure from being changed, such that the user can't add or delete worksheets. Since you want the user able to add and delete worksheets, you'd need to make two changes to how the workbook is used:

  • Modify the macro that adds worksheets so that it removes the workbook protection before adding the sheets and then reinstates the protection after the sheets are added.
  • Add a macro function that deletes worksheets. The macro could check to make sure that the user isn't trying to delete the control worksheets. If it is OK for the user to delete a particular worksheet, the macro would remove workbook protection, delete the sheet, and then reinstate the protection.

Another approach is to create duplicates of the control sheets in the workbook. Make these worksheets hidden, which protects them to a degree. Your macros could then check to see if the non-hidden control sheets were deleted. If they were, then the macro could create another control sheet by copying the hidden version of the control sheets.

Still another approach is to modify the macro that currently adds a bunch of worksheets to the workbook. The modification would create a "backup" workbook that contains the controls sheets. Later, before closing the workbook, a macro can be invoked that checks for the control sheets. If they are not present, then the macro copies them from the backup workbook. If they are present, then the backup workbook can be deleted.

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (3267) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Protecting Worksheets from Deletion.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Deleting Zero Values from a Data Table

Want to get rid of all the zero values in a range of cells? This tip provides a couple of different ways you can accomplish ...

Discover More

Controlling How Excel Interprets Percentages

When entering data in a worksheet, Excel tries to figure out how your entry can best be shown on the screen. When it comes to ...

Discover More

Opening a Document as Read-Only

Afraid of messing up an existing document by some changes you are considering? Consider opening the document as read-only, so ...

Discover More

Save Time and Supercharge Excel! Automate virtually any routine task and save yourself hours, days, maybe even weeks. Then, learn how to make Excel do things you thought were simply impossible! Mastering advanced Excel macros has never been easier. Check out Excel 2010 VBA and Macros today!

MORE EXCELTIPS (MENU)

Preventing Someone from Recreating a Protected Worksheet

When you share a protected workbook with other people, you may not want them to get around the protection by creating a new ...

Discover More

Protecting Worksheets

Excel allows data protection for particular cells or a whole worksheet in a shared work environment. Here's how to apply that ...

Discover More

Visually Showing a Protection Status

Need to know if a worksheet or workbook is currently protected? Excel provides some tell-tale signs, but here are some ways ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 8 - 1?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in ExcelTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share