Quickly Deleting Cells

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated March 21, 2015)

5

Everyone knows that you can delete cells in an Excel spreadsheet by choosing Delete from the Edit menu. If you are typing away, however, it can be a pain to access the Delete dialog box in this manner. A quick way to accomplish the same task is to simply press Ctrl+- (the minus key, either on the regular keyboard or the numeric keypad). This pops up the Delete dialog box right away, allowing you to save a couple of mouse clicks. (See Figure 1.)

Figure 1. The Delete dialog box

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2649) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is two less than 9?

2015-03-23 09:43:14

NW

Personally, I like to use alt-e-d (press them one at a time). That will bring up the same dialog box.

Then, of course, you can either arrow down/up to your selection (or press & hold the alt key and type the underlined letter corresponding to what action you want to take) all followed by [enter].


2015-03-21 18:12:17

Dave Onorato

Or the easy way? Copy a blank cell and paste it where you want the "deleted" pristine cell.
You can do this in a macro, too by invoking a copy/paste into whatever cell you are on. Just copy cell A65536 into the current cell.
And set that macro in personal with a keystroke.


2015-03-21 08:59:29

GaryC

How can you call this command out in VBA and then execute, so you can create a macro?


2015-03-21 08:57:30

GaryC

Never knew that, thank you that will be useful to remember.


2015-03-21 06:37:14

Marty

The shortcut for me was CTRL - It was confusing to me when you add the plus sign in between I thought I had to hold control then hit + and then minus


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