Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Quickly Changing Windows.

Quickly Changing Windows

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 26, 2016)

6

If you routinely use several open workbooks to do you work, you already know that you can change between workbook windows by choosing the workbook name from the Window menu. You may not know, however, that there is a shortcut for changing windows. You can cycle through your documents by pressing either Ctrl+F6 or Shift+Ctrl+F6. The difference is that Ctrl+F6 cycles through the list of windows in a forwards direction, while Shift+Ctrl+F6 cycles backwards.

Another shortcut is to use Ctrl+Tab and Shift+Ctrl+Tab to switch windows. These function just the same as Ctrl+F6 and Shift+Ctrl+F6.

If you would rather not take your hands off the mouse, you can create a macro which cycles through the windows. This macro can then be assigned to a toolbar button. The following macro will do the trick:

Sub ChangeWin()
    On Error GoTo ChangeWinErr
    Set nw = ActiveWindow.ActivateNext
    If Windows.Count > 1 Then
        nw.Activate
        Exit Sub
    End If
    ChangeWinErr:
        Windows(1).Activate
End Sub

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2078) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Quickly Changing Windows.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 5 + 0?

2017-07-10 14:34:19

Rhonda

Same question as Graham and Craig (and original Help Wanted):
If I cut a row from worksheet A and paste it on worksheet B, when I go back to worksheet A there is a blank row left behind which now must be deleted. I'm sure there is a macro solution for this but I'm wondering if instead there is a setting in Excel that could be used?


2017-07-10 03:51:43

Mark Galloway

An alternative to "Shift+Ctrl+=" is Ctrl + <"+" on numeric keypad>


2017-07-09 07:09:29

Peter Atherton

Graham, Craig

If you select both sheets, select 1st, hold shift select 2nd. Then select rows to delete


2017-07-08 13:45:18

Craig

These methods seem to be only for data on the same sheet (or perhaps for rows only). Is there also a way to close cut columns from sheet A to sheet B?

Thanks!


2017-07-08 13:20:50

S Vijay Krishna

Hi Allen

I follow another approach to for "closing up" rows and columns while cutting data in excel. Use Shift + Space to select row or Ctrl+space to select a column,then Ctrl+x to cut it,then move on to the desired column or row and press Ctrl and "+" (Ctrl+"+").


2017-07-08 09:35:37

Graham

These options all work if the rows are moved within a single WORKSHEET.

However, implied by the question is a requirement to move the rows to another Worksheet within the current Workbook. In this situation the blank rows are left behind in the initial Worksheet.

When moving to a different Worksheet, I do not know of an easy way to automate the 'Closing Up' of the cut rows. Maybe a macro is needed?


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