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Understanding Color and Conditional Formatting Codes

Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Excel versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Excel 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Excel, click here: Understanding Color and Conditional Formatting Codes.

In other issues of ExcelTips you learn how formatting codes are used to create custom formats used to display numbers, dates, and times. Excel also provides formatting codes to specify text display colors, as well as codes that indicate conditional formats. These formats only use a specific format when the value being displayed meets a certain criteria.

To understand these codes a bit better, take a look at this format within the Currency category:

$#,##0.00_);[Red]($#,##0.00)

Notice there are two number formats divided by a semicolon. If there are two formats like this, Excel assumes that the one on the left is to be used if the number is 0 or above, and the one on the right is to be used if the number is less than 0. This example results in all numbers having a dollar sign, a comma being used as a thousands separator, amounts less than $1.00 having a leading 0, and negative values being shown in red with surrounding parentheses. The _) part of the left format is used so that positive and negative numbers align properly (positive numbers will leave a space the same width as a right parenthesis after the number).

You are not limited to only two formats, as in this example. You can actually use four formats, each separated by a semicolon. The first is used if the value is above 0, the second is used if it is below 0, the third is used if it is equal to 0, and the fourth is used if the value being displayed is text.

The following table shows the color and conditional formatting codes. As you may have surmised, these codes are used with the formatting codes mentioned at the beginning of this tip as being in other issues of ExcelTips.

Symbol Effect
[Black] Black type.
[Blue] Blue type.
[Cyan] Cyan type.
[Green] Green type.
[Magenta] Magenta type.
[Red] Red type.
[White] White type.
[Yellow] Yellow type.
[COLOR x] Type in color code x, where x can be any value from 1 to 56.
[= value] Use this format only if the number equals this value.
[< value] Use this format only if the number is less than this value.
[<= value] Use this format only if the number is less than or equals this value.
[> value] Use this format only if the number is greater than this value.
[>= value] Use this format only if the number is greater than or equals this value.
[<> value] Use this format only if the number does not equal this value.

Note the COLOR code, where you can specify one of 56 different colors to be used in the format. If you would like additional information on what those 56 different colors are, you can find a helpful table at this address:

http://dmcritchie.mvps.org/excel/colors.htm#colorindex

ExcelTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Excel training. This tip (2136) applies to Microsoft Excel 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Excel (Excel 2007 and later) here: Understanding Color and Conditional Formatting Codes.

Related Tips:

A Picture is Worth Thousands! Your worksheets are not limited to holding numbers and text. You can also add graphics or easily create charts based on your data. Excel Graphics and Charts, available in two versions, helps you make your graphics and charts their absolute best. Check out Excel Graphics and Charts today!

 

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